National Consumers League

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Familiar faces in 2012 Top Ten Scams Report

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Top 10In 2012, fake check scams earned the dubious distinction of being the top scam reported by consumers to the NCL’s fraud complaint site, Fraud.org. Nearly 32 percent of the total scams reported fell into this category, and it is the second time in three years fake check scams topped our list.

 

 

Many consumers do not realize that if they deposit a fake check the account holder is responsible for paying the money back to the bank. Fake check scams take many forms, but the common thread in nearly all fake check scams is a request to wire money to a third party. Tip: Don’t wire money to someone you’ve never met and you should be able to avoid this scam.

 

Read the full report.

 

Internet-based scams including bogus online merchandise scams, lottery scams, and phishing scams totaled more than half of all complaints received by Fraud.org this year. The Jamaican lottery scam, which asks people to send an advance fee before receiving their prize, was widely publicized in 2012. While American and Jamaican law enforcement authorities have begun working together to curb this widespread fraud, prevention remains the best option for most consumers.

 

Consumers reported being contacted by phone in more than 42 percent of the total complaints received in 2012. Tip: Whenever someone asks you on the phone to send money ahead of time in order to receive a prize, don’t do it! In fact, never send money to anyone you don’t know and you will avoid much heartache and headache.

 

A growing scam in Fraud.org’s complaint data is the office directory/ad sales scam. Complaints about this scam increased by 7.36 percent from 2011 to 2012. In a typical office directory scam, a small business or non-profit organization is called and the receptionist or other front-line employee is asked to verify information about the business. If the mark does so, the organization shortly begins to receive threatening invoices for bogus online business listings or other advertisements. The scam artist may even threaten legal action if payment is not sent.

 

Regardless of the type of scam, many instances of fraud can be avoided by remembering the old rule of thumb: if something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

 

If you ever do have questions about a potential fraud or think you might be a victim of a scam, report it immediately via Fraud.org’s secure online complaint form. Embarrassment or fear of friends and relatives finding out about the crime causes many victims of fraud to remain silent. Only by speaking out can we give law enforcement the tools they need to bring these criminals to justice.

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