National Consumers League

Worker's Rights

In the earliest days of workplace advocacy, NCL played a role in establishing the 8-hour workday and the minimum wage. Today’s workplace poses many new safety and fairness challenges across all sectors, and NCL continues to fight to protect and improve Workers’ Rights.

Make it a union-made Halloween!

Have you bought candy to give out to trick-or-treaters on Halloween yet? Later this month, children across the country will cheerfully announce their presence at doorways hoping to receive sweet treats. While Halloween certainly belongs to children, adults get to make some decisions too—especially when it comes to buying treats that are American- and union-made. 

Read More →


Minimum wage movement building momentum

Our economic recovery is well underway, the stock market has reached record highs, and corporations are registering record profits. Yet American low-wage workers are struggling. A movement to increase the minimum wage, however, is gaining momentum. What could this mean for workers across the country? Will the federal government act to lift millions of Americans out of poverty.

Read More →


Long-awaited protection for child ag workers offered by CARE Act

Grecia Balli began working in farm fields when she was 10 years old. At age 14, she decided to drop out of school because her life as a migrant farmworker caused her to switch schools frequently, making it difficult for her to keep up academically. By age 17 she no longer dreamed of becoming a police officer, which had been her goal. Her life revolved around farm work.

Read More →


Saving workers' lives with the '10 cents' pledge

NCL has launched the 10 cents pledge campaign to harness consumers’ collective power and to send a message to retailers that we American consumers really do care about the health and safety of workers overseas who manufacture our clothes.

Read More →


Bangladeshi factory collapse igniting worker activist cries for improved safety

The death toll following the Rana Plaza building collapse in Bangladesh on April 24 has climbed to more than 1,000. There are hundreds of people – mostly women – injured and countless others still missing. In the wake of this tragedy, perhaps the deadliest ever garment-factory disaster, it is clear factory safety must be reexamined, and worker’s rights in Bangladesh must be given the highest priority.

Read More →