National Consumers League

Pages tagged "medications"

Consumers wary of therapeutic substitution

Therapeutic substitution, known also as drug switching and therapeutic interchange, is the practice of replacing a patient’s prescription drugs with chemically different drugs that are expected to have the same clinical effect. Many times patients switch to a different drug with no problems. However, for certain medications and conditions, therapeutic substitution could cause problems.


Don't waste your money-or your health-on counterfeit drugs

When shopping around for prescription medications, watch out for fakes! You could throw your money away on drugs that don’t work, or — even worse — get sick by taking counterfeits that aren’t what they pretend to be.


Don't waste your money - or risk your health - on counterfeit drugs

When shopping around for prescription medications, watch out for fakes! You could throw your money away on drugs that don’t work, or — even worse — get sick by taking counterfeits that aren’t what they pretend to be.


Common therapeutic drug substitutions

Therapeutic substitution, known also as drug switching and therapeutic interchange, is the practice of replacing a patient’s prescription drugs with chemically different drugs that are expected to have the same clinical effect. Many times patients switch to a different drug with no problems. However, for certain medications and conditions, therapeutic substitution could cause problems.


Aspirin and coronary vascular disease

Aspirin is a very common medication. It can be used to reduce pain, fever, and inflammation. Aspirin has another important benefit: it can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke in a person who has already had one. Studies are being conducted to see whether aspirin can prevent a first heart attack or stroke; some doctors recommend aspirin to certain patients who are at risk.


Speak the language of your drug coverage plan

If you're facing the opportunity to choose a new drug coverage plan for you and your family, you need to speak the language in order to weigh the costs and benefits.


OTC pain relievers and pregnancy

If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, ask your doctor or nurse before taking any medication (OTC or prescription). It is especially important not to use aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen sodium during the last three months of pregnancy unless directed to do so by a doctor, because these medicines may cause problems in the unborn child, or complications during delivery.


Answers to your questions about OTC painkillers

Every day millions of consumers turn to over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications for temporary relief of pain from headaches, colds, muscular ache, and arthritis, and to reduce fever. While these medications are largely safe when taken according to label directions, there are risks when taking any drug. Just because a medication is available on the shelf of your local grocery or discount store does not make it any safer than a drug that has been prescribed by your doctor.


Trends in medicine: What is evidence-based medicine?

Doctors and health care professionals are attempting to help patients make sense of the overload of health information by gathering, evaluating, and sharing well–tested, proven medical research. This process of bringing the best available evidence from scientific research to patient care is known as evidence-based medicine (EBM).


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